Category: Diabetes/Prediabetes/Hypoglycemia

Monitor: 17

17 - INCIDENCE AND RATE OF PROGRESSION OF PREDIABETES TO TYPE 2 DIABETES: A 10-YEAR RETROSPECTIVE STUDY FROM UAE

Saturday, Apr 27
11:30 AM – 12:00 PM

Objective : The standardized prevalence of diabetes in the UAE adult population has been estimated at 17.6%. However, there is limited published data on risk factors associated with progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the UAE population. This analysis investigated factors associated with higher risk of progression to diabetes, specifically for the UAE population.


Methods : We conducted a retrospective cohort study using relevant data on adult patients (age ≥16 years) across 3 Imperial College Diabetes Centers in UAE, over the period from 2007 to 2017(n=214,871). Patients with confirmed initial diagnosis of impaired glucose metabolism (Impaired fasting glucose and/or impaired glucose tolerance and/or HbA1c 5·7–6·4%) at the time of initial test followed by development of new onset T2DM over a 10-year period were included for analysis. Categorical variable and logistic regression analyses were used to identify factors associated with increased risk of progression to T2DM.


Results : In our screened population, impaired glucose metabolism was detected in 20.7% (n=44568) of subjects (57.1% females, mean age 35.5 +/- 15.2 years). During the study period, 9.3% (n=4134) of subjects developed T2DM (59.3% females, mean age 46.4±15 years). Median time of progression was 20 months. Obesity was more prevalent in patients who progressed to T2DM (64.8 %, mean BMI 35.8 +/- 7 kg/m2) compared to subjects who did not progress (48.2%, mean BMI 30.3±4 kg/m2, P<0.001). Obesity (BMI≥30 kg/m2) at time of initial diagnosis of impaired glucose metabolism was associated with higher risk of progression to T2DM (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.04 to 1.1) (P<0.03). Risk of developing T2DM is noted to be higher in females compared to males (P<0.01) and higher in older individuals (age≥40 years) at time of initial diagnosis (P<0.01).


Discussion : Our results indicate that in the UAE population conversion to T2DM occurs at a rate of 9.3% per year after an average of 20 months of prediabetes diagnosis. Development of T2DM influenced by multiple factors including obesity, female gender and older age. Other factors including genetics, epigenetics and gut microbiome need to be considered for future studies in same population.


Conclusion : Results of this study demonstrated that obesity, female gender and older age at time of initial diagnosis were the main risk factors associated with higher risk of progressing to T2DM in UAE population.

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Majid Alameri

Fellowship Trainee
Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Fellowship Trainee of Diabetes and Endocrinology at Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Wafic Wafa

Consultant physician
Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Al Ain, UAE., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Consultant Diabetologist/Endocrinologist at Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Al Ain, UAE.

Alia AlTikriti

Research Project Coordinator
Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Research Project Coordinator at Imperial College London Diabetes Centre, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Ilham Saadane

Clinical Data Analyst
Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Clinical Data Analyst at Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Budour Alkaf

Clinical Research Fellow
Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Clinical Research Fellow at Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Maha Barakat

Consultant physician
Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE., Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Research Director at Imperial College London Diabetes Center, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Nader Lessan

Consultant physician
Imperial College London Diabetes Centre, Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Consultant Diabetologist and Endocrinologist at the Imperial College London Diabetes Centre Abu Dhabi